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FUNSAT Design Competition

The basic FUNSAT (Florida University SATellite) is a pico-satellite with a maximum mass of 1.33 Kg and the size of 10 x 10 x 10 cm3 (i.e. 1U). However, we allow its extension up to 6U (8 kg) though our funding for the construction may be limited to support 1U cost. The main objectives of this competition are promotion of an interdisciplinary project for systems engineering, supporting a test-bed for advanced technologies such as MEMS, and promoting advanced study and career development for Florida students in the field of aerospace.

The 2nd biennial FUNSAT competition is scheduled to begin this Fall 2015. This design competition is structured to allow students to have a two-year turnaround on an actual system design project: the detailed design in the first year and the flight model construction in the second year. This competition will allow students to work closely with professionals from the field on a project that will have great significance in the coming years. The competition will include the design, fabrication, and a possible launch into space for the winning design. In the conceptual design (first round), competitors will be provided with technical support by FSGC, NASA and space industries. The finalists will be partially supported for their detailed design and building of their FUNSAT, including the final technical workshop. FSGC will work with the winning team to secure funding for the building of the cubesat

The Florida University Satellite (FUNSAT) Design Competition is sponsored by Florida Space Grant Consortium and the Florida Space Institute.

 

NOTICE OF INTENT DEADLINE HAS BEEN EXTENDED TO SEPTEMBER 14, 2015

Hybrid Motor Rocket Competition

2016-17 Hybrid Motor High Powered Rocket Competition

Sponsored by the NASA Florida Space Grant Consortium (FSGC) and the North East Florida Association of Rocketry (NEFAR)

Click to: Download PDF Version of 2016-17 RFP Hybrid Rocket Comp or Download MS Word Version of 2016-17 RFP Hybrid Rocket Comp
Click to: Download PDF Version of 2016-17 Hybrid Rocket Proposal Cover Page or Download MS Word Version of 2016-17 Hybrid Rocket Proposal Cover Page
 Check out the Launch Day Video – March 12, 2016!!!

2016-2017 Hybrid Motor High Powered Rocket Competition

Sponsored by the NASA Florida Space Grant Consortium (FSGC) and the North East Florida Association of Rocketry (NEFAR)

I. Introduction

The objective of the competition is to build and launch a hybrid powered rocket.  There are two categories of competition; the first category consists of launching a hybrid rocket to the maximum altitude and the second category challenges the teams to fly their rocket closest to 2,000 feet.  There must be at least two teams competing in each category.  If there is only one team, they will be asked to move to the other category.

  1. This competition is open to any university or community college team in Florida, both public and private.
  2. The rocket can be built from scratch or from a kit.
  3. The engine must be a hybrid motor rated “G” or from a lower class. The engine can be built from scratch or purchased from a company.  NOTE: If the motor is built from scratch or is modified in any way, a minimum of two documented motor tests must be done to demonstrate the safety, quality, and performance of the motor.  Documentation must be performed and submitted two-weeks before launch and must show thrust curves, impulse, burn-time, etc. from the two tests (please confer with FSGC  prior to making any modifications to the motor).

 

II. Proposal

 

The Faculty Advisor of the university team must submit a two-page proposal with a budget of up to $600.00.  The proposal must be submitted by the Faculty Advisor through that institution’s Sponsored Research Office – otherwise the proposal will not be accepted. If a team is planning to enter both categories, please submit separate proposals (maximum two- pages each).

                 

The proposal will include:

  1. 2016-17 Hybrid Rocket Proposal Cover Page with Signatures.
  2. Faculty Advisor’s email address and contact information.
  3. The team name.
  4. Which category is the team competing in (Maximum Altitude or Closest to 2,000ft).
  5. Answer the following questions: Why does your team want to compete in this competition? Why do you think your team can actually meet the objective of building and launching a hybrid powered rocket?
  6. A Detailed Budget (Please note that Indirect costs are not allowed). The budget should only include items that are needed for the construction of the hybrid rocket. Stipends to students are disallowed. Travel costs to the launch site can be included. Please note that travel funds can only be provided to US citizens.
  7. Student Project Manager, Student Project Alternate Manager, All Team Members:
    a. Name and email address.
    b. Status (Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, Senior etc.)
    c. Subject major enrolled
    d. Hometown
    e. Gender
    f. Race (Needed for Reporting to Funding Authority – Please Choose: Native American, Pacific Islander, African American, Hispanic, Caucasian, Other, Asian)

Please note that the starting date is October 7, 2016. This date is just the award date for funding purposes. Teams can begin their work from September 23, 2016 (announcement date for the selected teams), however costs cannot be incurred before October 7, 2016.

Proposals without the team member information (see item 7) will not be accepted.    Teams can always change the composition of the team. If the team members differ from the original proposal, please email the relevant student information (see item 7) to the FSGC office. We require the student demographic information as NASA requires us to report the data. We only submit aggregate numbers. Individual information is never released.

All teams that submit a proposal, and are accepted, will be eligible to take part in the competition and compete for additional funding.  At least 6 teams (from both categories) will be selected and awarded up to $600 to build the rocket (detailed budget must be provided in the proposal).  For teams that design their own engines, static testing and data from two test launches is expected.  The funds will be provided as a cost reimbursable grant to the Faculty Advisor.  The funds can be used for supplies, motors, kits and travel.  Salary and capital expenditure is not allowed.  Indirect costs are not allowed.

Submit Proposal via email to: Gene Tavares, Eugene.Tavares@ucf.edu

Submit Technical Questions via email to: Robert Eppig, beppig@cfl.rr.com

 

Inquiries: Financial and Other

All financial inquiries must come from the Faculty Advisor and/or that institution’s Sponsored Research Office. We will not entertain any award related and/or financial inquiries from the Student Project Manager, Student Project Alternate Manager, or Team Members.

All other inquiries must come from the Student Project Manager or the Student Project Alternate Manager. FSGC will not entertain any inquiries from other Team Members.

 

III. Reports and Flight

Teams will build and test their rockets for flight and will be required to submit an engineering notebook due approximately two-weeks before the launch.  Also, the Student Project Manager or the Student Project Alternate Manager from each team will be required to submit, every two-weeks, a “Progress and Accomplishment Report” of no more then 3/4 page text to the PBWorks website: http://hybridrocket.pbworks.com/

On September 27, 2016 the Faculty Advisor, Student Project Manager, and the Student Project Alternate Manager will be given access to the PBWorks website (via an email account and password log-in).
Reports should include work done plus attachments including parts lists, photos, etc.  NOTE: There are no points awarded for submitting the Progress and Accomplishment Reports however, points will be deducted for non-submittal and late reports.

Also, each team will be required to submit to the PBWorks website a Hazard Analysis and a Failure Modes & Effects Analysis (FMEA) report by November 11, 2016.  The Hazard Analysis should focus on the handling and use of the nitrous oxide and any pyrotechnic systems or materials.  The Failure Modes & Effects Analysis should focus on what kinds of things could go wrong with your launch equipment and rocket, as well as, what you have done to mitigate or reduce the identified failure modes.  These reports should be no more than four text pages in length, tables and graphs are not included in page count.  They should be updated and resubmitted as your designs evolve.  The reports are to show that you are ready to test and fly your rockets and motors safely.  Failure to submit these reports may result in your being removed from the competition.

 

IV. Launch Day

Teams will have their rockets and motors inspected for safety by a NEFAR representative just before launch (March 11, 2017).  NEFAR will sponsor the launch at the club site in Bunnell.  Results of launch must be in to the judge by 3:00 pm on the day of the launch; judge will leave site at 3:15 pm.  NOTE:  We are not responsible for problems at the NEFAR launch site.  Be there early.  Don’t wait until it is too late to launch.  To be awarded points for flight you must have a successful flight; i.e. launch, deployment of recovery system, and controlled landing.  All other flights will be judged on a case by case base.  NOTE: Rockets deemed unsafe will not be allowed to fly in the competition until fixed and approved.

NEFAR Website: http://www.nefar.net

a. Altimeters

A recording barometric altimeter must be used to record data for competition.  The launch site should be considered zero altitude and the altimeter should be calibrated to zero, it is up to flier to provide proof of a properly calibrated altimeter to the Judge upon request.

Altimeters with altitude sensors other than barometric sensors, such as accelerometers or magnetic apogee detection, may be used to deploy the recovery systems.  However, they are prohibited from use in determining the actual altitude.

b. Determining Actual Altitude

The actual flight profile will be determined by the competition judges.  The graph or other flight profile display provided by a recording device will be examined for accuracy.  If it is shown that a sudden peak in altitude is attributable to the ejection charge, that peak will be not be used to determine the recorded altitude.  The altitude just prior to or just after that sudden peak will be the official recorded altitude.

c. Launch Rails & Firing Electronics Requirements

Teams should provide their own launch rails/pads and firing electronics and if requested must be inspected for safety by a NEFAR representative.  NOTE THIS REQUIREMENT: firing electronics must be at least 300 feet away from launch rails/pads.  Firing electronics should incorporate at least one safety switch to prevent accidental ignition of rocket during setup.  Please insure that you have enough current available to ignite the motor with 300 foot of cable.  If you wish to use NEFAR launch equipment please contact Robert Eppig for our NEFAR representative contact information – to check if what you need is available.  Please check early if you wish to use NEFAR equipment-THERE IS NO GUARANTEE THAT WHAT YOU NEED IS AVAILABLE. 

d. Static Judging

For the teams that build their rocket and/or engine from scratch, their scores from the judges will reflect the originality and performance of the rocket and/or the engine.

Motor Class Total Impulse

G or less: 160 Newton-seconds or less

 

V. Scoring

Points will be awarded for the phases of the competition.  The successful flight is worth 80% of the total points and the teams Engineering Notebook report is worth 20% of the total points.  The points for each part are as follows:

  1. Points for Flight
    a.  100 pts for highest or closest to altitude
    b.  90 pts for 2ndhighest or closest to altitude
    c.  80 pts or 3rdhighest or closest to altitude
    d.  70 pts for 4thhighest or closest to altitude
    e.  0-10 pts for self-built motor
    f.  0-5 pts for self-built rocket
  2. Points for Engineering Notebook
    a.  RockSim or other software simulations (30 pts)
    b.  Engineering Data (70 pts)
  3. Points for Progress and Accomplishment Report
    a. There are no points awarded for submitting the Progress and Accomplishment Reports however, points will be deducted for late and non-submittal reports. For each day late you will lose 1% of your total weighted score (with a maximum of 3% lose for each late report). For each no-submittal report, you will lose 3% of your total weighted score.
  4. Hazard Analysis and a Failure Modes & Effects Analysis Report (FEMA)
    a. There are no points awarded for submitting the Hazard Analysis and FEMA reports, however failure to submit these reports may result in your team being removed from the competition.

 

Engineering Notebook – will be a bound notebook (Composition type notebook) which will have all of the team’s engineering data, calculations, drawings and sketches, test results, notes, ideas, meeting notes, etc.
NOTE: The notebook is NOT a formal final report.  We are looking for your project/laboratory workbook. You will submit the Engineering Notebook to the PBWorks website (digitally) or mail a hard-copy of the report to the NASA FSGC offices (if mailed, the notebook will be returned to the teams on flight day).

 

VI. Additional Funding

As mentioned earlier in this RFP, at least 6 teams (from both categories) will be selected and awarded up to $600 to build the rocket (detailed budget must be provided in the proposal).

The winning teams from each category will receive additional funding according to the following chart. These additional funds will be provided to the winning team(s) as additional funding to the project award given to them earlier at the start of the program. These funds may be used for supplementing the project costs and/or for expenses incurred for travel to the competition location. Please note that travel costs can only be provided to US citizens.

 

Place Maximum Altitude Category Closest to 2000 ft. Category
1st Place $500.00 $750.00
2nd Place $300.00 $450.00
3rd Place $100.00 $200.00

Inquiries: Financial and Other

All financial and award related inquiries must come from the Faculty Advisor and/or the institution Sponsored Research Office. We will not entertain any financial inquiries from the Student Project Manager, Student Project Alternate Manager, or Team Members.

All other inquiries must come from the Student Project Manager or the Student Project Alternate Manager. FSGC will not entertain any inquiries from other Team Members.

 

VII. Timeline

  1. Sept. 20, 2016: Proposal with Budget and Cover Page with Signatures, Deadline.
  2. Sept. 23, 2016: Announcement of winners and grant awarded to faculty advisor.
  3. Sept. 27, 2016: Participant access given to the PBWorks website via email.
  4. Oct. 7, 2016: First of the every two week report due.
  5. Nov. 11, 2016: Hazard Analysis, Failure Modes & Effects Analysis due.
  6. March 3, 2017: Engineering Notebook due at Florida Space Grant Offices (either hard copy or digital upload to the PBWorks website).
  7. March 11, 2017: Launch (April 8th: alternate date). Launch date is subject to change.

 

 

2015-16 Winners

 

Maximum Altitude Category

1st Place: UWF Argonauts Max

2nd Place: FIT Max Altitude

3rd Place: UM RocketCanes

 

Closest to 2000 ft. Category 

1st Place: UWF Argonauts 2K

2nd Place: FIT Precision

3rd Place: UF Hybrid Gators

 

2015-16 Participating Universities

Schools: 10
Teams: 20
Closest to 2K: 9 Teams
Maximum Altitude: 11 Teams

1. University of North Florida (1 Team)

2. University of Miami (1)

3. Florida Institute of Technology (2)

4. University of West Florida (2)

5. University of South Florida (5)

6. Florida International University (3)

7. University of Central Florida (2)

8. University of Florida (2)

9. Eastern Florida State College (1)

10. Florida Atlantic University (2)


2014-15 Winners

Maximum Altitude

First Place: University of Central Florida (MAED Maximum Thrust Team)

Second Place: University of South Florida (SOAR Peregrine Team)

Third Place: University of West Florida (Electrocketers2 Team)

Closest to 2000 feet

First Place: Florida Institute of Technology (Ace Team)

Second Place: University of West Florida (Argonauts1 Team)

Third Place: University of South Florida (SOAR Taurus Team)

2014-15 Participating Universities

1. University of Central Florida (3 teams)

2. University of Florida (2)

3. University of Miami (1)

4. University of West Florida (4)

5. Florida International University (1)

6. Florida Institute of Technology (4)

7. Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (1)

8. University of South Florida (5)

9. University of North Florida (1)

10. Florida Atlantic University (2)

2013-14 Winners

Maximum Altitude

First Place: Florida Institute of Technology

Second Place: University of West Florida

Third Place: University of Florida

Closest to 2000 feet

First Place: University of Central Florida

Second Place: Florida Institute of Technology

Third Place: Florida International University

 

2013-14 Participating Universities

1. University of Central Florida (1 team)

2. University of Florida (1)

3. University of Miami (1)

4. University of West Florida (1)

5. Daytona State College (1)

6. Florida International University (1)

7. Florida Institute of Technology (2)

8. Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (2)

9. University of South Florida (3)

2012-13 Winners

Maximum Altitude

First Place: University of Central  Florida

Second Place: Florida Institute of Technology

Third Place: University of Florida

Closest to 2000 feet

First Place: Florida Institute of Technology

Second Place: University of Florida

Third Place: University of Central Florida

 

2012-13 Participating Universities

1. University of Central Florida

2. University of Florida

3. University of Miami

4. Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

5. Florida Institute of Technology

2011-12 Winners

Maximum Altitude

First Place: University of Florida

Second Place: Florida Institute of Technology

Third Place: Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Closest to 2000 feet

First Place: Florida Institute of Technology

Second Place: University of Florida

Third Place: University of Central Florida

Senior Design Projects and NASA Competitions

2016-17 SENIOR DESIGN PROJECTS AND NASA COMPETITIONS

The NASA Florida Space Grant Consortium will be supporting senior design projects (up to $500 for each project), NASA Competition participation (up to $2000) and other competitions for the 2016-17 Academic Year. Priority will be given to NASA competitions. Examples of NASA competitions are

NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge
Robotic Mining Competition
University Student Launch Initiative
2017 NASA RASC-AL Competition
High Altitude Student Platform (HASP)

Request for funding should be submitted by a faculty advisor in a Florida university or College, affiliated with FSGC, through that institution’s Sponsored Research Office. Proposals not submitted through the affiliate institution’s Sponsored Research Office will not be accepted. The funds can be utilized only for purchase of materials and supplies related to the project. If the funds are to be used for travel reimbursement, only students who are US citizens are eligible for travel reimbursement through the FSGC award funds. Any funding request exceeding $2000 will require at least 1:1 matching through non-federal funds. The matching can be cash and/or in-kind matching. Match can be in the form of either cash or in-kind, including waived indirect costs, academic release for faculty members, student stipends, instrument, and computer time. However, equipment purchase and/or cost of pro-rated use cannot be considered as match.

Work and/or student involvement in the project should commence only AFTER receipt of signed award documents from Univ. of Central Florida, acting as fiscal agents of NASA Florida Space Grant Consortium.

 

The request should include

  1. student project proposal cover page sheet (both pages)
  2. a brief description of the project,
  3. its relevance to NASA (if applicable),
  4. how the award funds and/or match funds (where applicable) will be spent
  5. a spreadsheet showing the following details of each student participating in the project.

Since FSGC is a Training Grant, this demographic and other information is required for onward submission to NASA HQ as part of our annual report.  We do not send individual information. All the information is aggregated and then compiled into our annual report to NASA. NASA in turn uses this information to present Space Grant program highlights to Congressional delegates in order to secure future years funding for the National Space Grant program through the NASA Education Office. 

Indirect cost will be determined as per Clause 3.4 of the signed Master Agreements between UCF, acting on behalf of FSGC and the awardee institution.

Maximum possible funding request for NASA competitions is limited to $2000. Any funding request exceeding $2000 will be entertained, if funds are available. Any funding over $2000 will require matching. The matching can be cash and/or in-kind matching.

Teams requesting less than $2000 for NASA competitions will increase their chances of being funded if they provide matching funds.

 

Please email or mail your signed proposal to:

Sreela Mallick

NASA Florida Space Grant Consortium

Partnership 1 Building

12354 Research Parkway, Room 214

Orlando, FL, 32826 -0650

Email: sreela.mallick@ucf.edu

For technical information, please contact Dr. Jaydeep Mukherjee at jaydeep.mukherjee@ucf.edu

 

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Senior Design Projects and NASA Competitions supported in 2015-16

Reusable Entry Vehicle for Suborbital Science – Univ. of Central Florida (UCF)

Diverse Air-bearing Weightless Environment Project DAWN – Florida Institute of Technology (FIT)

Mars Society’s University Rover Challenge – FIT

Unmanned underwater-air hybrid vehicle (Shark Bait) – FIT

Developing a planetary rover prototype with the capability of carrying multiple payloads for space resource utilization.  – UCF

Land Based Autonomous Vehicle for the Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition – Florida State University (FSU)

2016 Robotic Mining Competition – FIT, Univ. of Florida (UF), Univ. of North Florida (UNF)

Student Launch Initiative – Florida International University (FIU), UCF

High Altitude Student Platform (HASP) – UCF, UF

Mircogravity NeXt Design Challenge – Embry Riddle Aronautical University (ERAU)

 

Senior Design Projects and NASA Competitions supported in 2014-15

Centrifugal Dust Experiment (CEDEX) – Univ. of Central Florida

AIAA-UCF CanSat – Univ. of Central Florida

AIAA Design Build Fly  – Univ. of Central Florida

Simulated planetary science device

Design and construction of an RC aircraft

Magnetically Coupled Mixer/Pump System for Cryogenic Propellant Tank Destratification  – Florida State University

Visible Light Communication for Wireless Internet Connection – Florida International University

UCF 2015 NASA Robotic Mining Team – University of Central Florida

UF 2015 NASA Robotic Mining Team – University of Florida

Asteroid Regolith Simulant Design and Development (Micro-g Neutral Buoyancy Experiment Design Teams (Micro-g NExT))- Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Rock Chip Sampling Device for Microgravity Bodies (Micro-g Neutral Buoyancy Experiment Design Teams (Micro-g NExT))- University of South Florida

 

Senior Design Projects and NASA Competitions supported in 2013-14

  1.  Design of a flexible cubesat bus –  Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
  2. Design of an electrodynamic tether and deployment mechanism fora 3U cubesat – Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
  3. Android Mobile Device Controlled Compact Potentiostat for a Portable and Affordable Biosensor Platform – Florida International University
  4. Multi-Purpose UAV – Florida International University

  5. UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE WITH FIRE EXTINGUISHING GRENADE RELEASE AND INSPECTION SYSTEM – Florida International University
  6. AUVSI SUAS Seafarer Competition UAV Platform – Florida International University

  7. Direct Drive Solar Powered Arcjet Thruster – Florida State University
  8. Mars Lander Robot Recharger – Florida State University
  9. NASA/RASC-AL Robo-Ops Project – Florida State University
  10. Heavy Lift Model Aircraft – University of Central Florida
  11. Liquid Rocket Engine – University of Central Florida
  12. Relay-Assisted Network for Guidance of Exploration Robots – University of Central Florida
  13. LED-based sensor for simultaneous, time-resolved measurements of CO and CO2 from hybrid rocket exhausts – University of Central Florida
  14. Micro Air Vehicles – University of Central Florida
  15. Florida Tech 2014 NASA Robotic Mining Team – Florida Institute of Technology
  16. UCF 2014 NASA Robotic Mining Team – University of Central Florida
  17. UF 2014 NASA Robotic Mining Team – University of Florida
  18. Oculus Microgravity Team – Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
  19. Miami Microghravity Team – University of Miami
  20. Investigation of Stiff Deployment Mechanism for Small Satellite Platforms – University of Florida
  21. Student Launch Initiative – University of Central Florida
  22. Precision Time Transfer with CubeSats – University of Florida

Senior Design Projects and NASA Competitions supported in 2012-13

  1. Smart Materials Museum Exhibit  Design – Florida State University
  2. Multi-Element Free Space Optical Modules for Mobile Communications and Smart Lighting – Florida International University
  3. Remote Access Arm – University of South Florida
  4. Aerial Reconnaissance Drone Program – Florida International University
  5. Non-Orbiting Balloon Science – Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
  6. Ozone Analysis – Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
  7. Micro Air Vehicle(MAV) Autonomous Wing Control – University of Central Florida
  8. AAA Design Build Fly- University of Central Florida
  9. Aero Design Competition: Mirco Class – University of Central Florida
  10. Design & Construction of a Heavy Lift Model Air Craft – University of Central Florida
  11. Search and Rescue Unmanned Aerial Vehicle – University of Miami
  12. NASA RASC-AL ROBO-OPS  – FAMU-FSU College of Engineering
  13. Airforce Nanosatellite Competition – Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
  14. NASA  2013 Lunabotics – Embry-Rdlle Aeronautical University
  15. NASA  2013 Lunabotics – Florida Institute of Technology
  16. Astronomy Society Balloon Project – University of Central Florida
  17. Ballooning workshop – Florida International University

Senior Design Projects supported in 2011-12

  1. AIAA Design, Build, Fly Competition – University of Central Florida
  2. Designing Electrical Systems for Testing the Ionosphere using Nano-satellite – Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
  3. Autonomous Sensory Aerial Platform – Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
  4. BLUAV Hydrogen Fuel Cell Unmanned Aerial Vehicle – University of Central Florida
  5. Design Build Fly – University of Miami
  6. Micro Air Vehicle Robust Pitch Control (MAVRC) – University of Central Florida

Senior Design Projects supported in 2010-2011:

  1. The Recoverable Ionospheric Rocket Project – University of Central Florida
  2. High Altitude Balloon program – Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
  3. The design, and building of  a high speed photometer- Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
  4. The design and construction of  a high-throughput, imaging optical spectrograph- Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
  5. Aerobots – Florida International University
  6. Aerial Robotics – University of Miami
  7. Design and build an unmanned electric powered, radio controlled aircraft – University of Miami
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